Tuesday, September 16, 2008

Reflections: Too Much of a Good Thing

There is a massive irony lodged in the gut of the American political system. The political left, one of the chief characteristics of which is a constant, strident call for more democracy, has, in national elections over the past fifty years, been repeatedly defeated by the very democratic impulse that it strives to nurture.

Over and over again, Democratic candidates, their surrogates and supporters, as well as liberal elements of the media, have pointed out to the American public that the men being put forward as presidential candidates by the Republican Party were just not bright enough for the job. Those same candidates have responded with Aw, shucks--just plain folks campaigns that have largely been successful. Candidates such as Eisenhower, Reagan, and Bush 43, have all worked this gimmick successfully, even though the results of their presidencies have shown the liberal message to have been both truthful and predictive. And now (amazingly enough) even McCain, the multimillionaire consort of a beer distributorship heiress and the son and grandson of Navy Admirals, seems to be utilizing this tactic successfully against the true “man of the people,” Barack Obama.

Obama’s sin is to have--against all odds--succeeded. By accomplishing more than could ever have been predicted for the mixed-race son of a single mom, Obama has left Joe Sixpack, Joe Lunchbucket, and Billy Joe McShmoe behind, trapped in their addictions and their entertainments, their consequentially meaningless lives, and their unrewarding series of dead-end jobs; has left them--yes--clinging to their guns and their flat-earth version of religion. Ah’m jist as good as you are, they drawl—knowing full well, deep down inside, where that last bucket of KFC is lodged, generating suet and bowel gas, that they ain’t. Not really. But, by Gawd, they can vote for the man (or babe) who tells them that they are.

The problem, ironically, is too much democracy. The Founding Fathers knew the danger. We have clearly forgotten it.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

the true “man of the people,” Barack Obama...

Obama has left Joe Sixpack, Joe Lunchbucket, and Billy Joe McShmoe behind, trapped in their addictions and their entertainments, their consequentially meaningless lives, and their unrewarding series of dead-end jobs.

These two statements appear to be inconsistent. How can he be the true man of the people and be so unlike them?

Both candidats support faith based initiatives and therefore, neither is worthy of a vote.

Rodak said...

Obama's origins are "of the people." The single best thing about America is the possibility of upward mobility. Obama started at the bottom, and rose toward the top. McCain, like Bush before him, started at the top and plateaued there. Neither of them, by my estimation, has distinguished himself that much among his privileged peers.
Sarah Palin, like Obama, is "of the people," which is her primary appeal.
My point in all of this is that it is most unfair for his opponents to attack Obama as "elitist" simply because he has overcome the obstacles set before by circumstances and has excelled in most everything he's tried to-date.

Anonymous said...

You write: Obama's origins are "of the people."
Are McCain's origins of wolves or something?
You write: "My point in all of this is that it is most unfair for his opponents to attack Obama as "elitist" simply because he has overcome the obstacles set before by circumstances and has excelled in most everything he's tried to-date."
I thought the problem was too much democracy?

You mentioned appeal twice. Bush appealed to the majority of voters last election. The REAL problem is, in the words of our greatest philosopher-in-comedian-disguise George Carlin, the public. These candidates come from american schools and american colleges and american parents and american ideas. Your beef is with the public. Your Joe Sixpack, Joe Lunchbucket, and Billy Joe McShmoe... trapped in their addictions and their entertainments, their consequentially meaningless lives, and their unrewarding series of dead-end jobs, i.e. the american public.

Rodak said...

McCain's origins were son and grandson of admirals preceding his own military career.
Exactly right my problem is with the public. They've allowed the McCain propaganda machine to convince them that Obama is the "elite" candidate, and McCain is the "man of the people." Exactly the opposite is the case.
Neither Obama nor McCain is currently like Joe Lunchbucket. But one of them has been there. The other hasn't.

Anonymous said...

Rodak,
Your use of the word "propaganda machine" is a reference to the Nazi apparatus that was indeed that. Your bias is evident.
Both candidates are using any edge they can to get elected. That is the game. The Media is the medium. The real question for you is what do you believe? That Harvard Obama or Navy McCain is "of the people?" Gondis

Rodak said...

You meant "Annapolis" McCain, I assume. It's not like he was a galley slave.
As for my bias, I make no effort to hide it. I am of the left. I oppose that which is of the right, philosophically, ideologically, and viscerally.