Friday, July 8, 2011

Quote du Jour - re: William Blake

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from Blake and the Bible by Christopher Rowland

Blake espoused what might be termed an inclusive version of the Body of Christ doctrine in which redemption is the recognition of the fact that one was already as a human being part of the divine body and in this space has the awareness to practice forgiveness of sins and the annihilation of selfhood. [p.200]
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4 comments:

Fiocle said...

I like the quote.

Rodak said...

Yes. It describes an important aspect of Blake's radical take on Christianity--a take that appeals to me.

Janette Tingle said...

So we have always been part of God, the divine body, and not actually separated in our self-created un-reality of earth-bound perceptions. We have created an illusory, separated Self that needs redemption. The only way we can save ourselves, is by recognizing that God lives within everyone. The only way we can make our return to God, is by annihilating the illusions of guilt and sin through forgiveness, giving back divinity to each other. "Redemption is the recognition of the fact that one was already as a human being part of the divine body and in this space has the awareness to practice forgiveness of sins and the annihilation of selfhood." In this sense, selfhood refers to the self-created ego. The annihilation of selfhood is the goal of Blake's Revolutionary man, who finds renewed meaning and comes alive once he revives his creative energy of desire, and the delightful, positive emotions in his life: "For everything that lives is holy, life delights in life; Because the soul of sweet delight can never be defil'd. Fires inwarp the earthly globe, yet man is not consum'd; Amidst the lustful fires he walks; his feet become like brass, His knees and thighs like silver, & his breast and head like gold." Although the lustful fires of desire "inwarp the earthly globe", man is not consumed, but instead, he is purified of his earthly perceptions and illusions, and is transformed into a divine body.

Rodak said...

"In this sense, selfhood refers to the self-created ego. The annihilation of selfhood is the goal of Blake's Revolutionary man, who finds renewed meaning and comes alive once he revives his creative energy of desire, and the delightful, positive emotions in his life: 'For everything that lives is holy, life delights in life;'..."
Yes, that's the key. Thanks for sharing this, Janette!